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Title:  Advanced glycation end-product intermediaries and post-amadori inhibition

United States Patent:  6,750,209

Issued:  June 15, 2004

Inventors:  Hudson; Billy G. (Omaha Park, AR); Todd; Parvin (Kansas City, KS); Khalifah; Raja Gabriel (Overland Park, KS); Booth; Aaron Ashley (Kansas City, KS)

Assignee:  Kansas University Medical Center (Kansas City, KS)

Appl. No.:  520933

Filed:  March 8, 2000

Abstract

The instant invention provides compositions and methods for modeling post-Amadori AGE formation and the identification and characterization of effective inhibitors of post-Amadori AGE formation, and such identified inhibitor compositions.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with the present invention, a stable post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product (AGE) precursor has been identified which can then be used to rapidly complete the post-Amadori conversion into post-Amadori AGEs. This stable product is a presumed sugar saturated Amadori/Schiff base product produced by the further reaction of the early stage protein/sugar Amadori product with more sugar. In a preferred embodiment, this post-Amadori/Schiff base intermediary has been generated by the reaction of target protein with ribose sugar.

The instant invention provides for a method of generating stable protein-sugar AGE formation intermediary precursors via a novel method of high sugar inhibition. In a preferred embodiment the sugar used is ribose.

The instant invention provides for a method for identifying an effective inhibitor of the formation of late Maillard products comprising: generating stable protein-sugar post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product intermediates by incubating a protein with sugar at a sufficient concentration and for sufficient length of time to generate stable post-Amadori AGE intermediates; contacting said stable protein-sugar post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product intermediates with an inhibitor candidate; identifying effective inhibition by monitoring the formation of post-Amadori AGEs after release of the stable protein-sugar post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product intermediates from sugar induced equilibrium. Appropriate sugars include, and are not limited to ribose, lyxose, xylose, arabinose, glucose, fructose, maltose, lactose, mannose, fructose and galactose. In a preferred embodiment the sugar used is ribose.

The instant invention teaches that an effective inhibitor of post-Amadori AGE formation via "late" reactions can be identified and characterized by the ability to inhibit the formation of post-Amadori AGE end-products in an assay comprising; generating stable protein-sugar post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product intermediates by incubating a protein with sugar at a sufficient concentration and for sufficient length of time to generate stable post-Amadori AGE intermediates; contacting said stable protein-sugar post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product intermediates with an inhibitor candidate; identifying effective inhibition by monitoring the formation of post-Amadori AGEs after release of the stable protein-sugar post-Amadori advanced glycation end-product intermediates from sugar induced equilibrium. In a preferred embodiment the assay uses ribose.

Thus the methods of the instant invention allow for the rapid screening of candidate post-Amadori AGE formation inhibitors for effectiveness, greatly reducing the cost and amount of work required for the development of effective small molecule inhibitors of post-Amadori AGE formation. The instant invention teaches that effective inhibitors of post-Amadori "late" reactions of AGE formation include derivatives of vitamin B6 and vitamin B1, in the preferred embodiment the specific species being pyridoxamine and thiamine pyrophosphate.

The instant invention teaches new methods for rapidly inducing diabetes like pathologies in rats comprising administering ribose to the subject animal. Further provided for is the use of identified inhibitors pyridoxamine and thiamine pyrophosphate in vivo to inhibit post-Amadori AGE induced pathologies.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Animal Models for Protein Aging

Alloxan induced diabetic Lewis rats have been used as a model for protein aging to demonstrate the in vivo effectiveness of inhibitors of AGE formation. The correlation being demonstrated is between inhibition of late diabetes related pathology and effective inhibition of AGE formation (Brownlee, Cerami, and Vlassara, 1988, New Eng. J. Med. 318(20):1315-1321). Streptozotocin induction of diabetes in Lewis rats, New Zealand White rabbits with induced diabetes, and genetically diabetic BB/Worcester rats have also been utilized, as described in, for example, U.S. Pat. No. 5,334,617 (incorporated by reference). A major problem with these model systems is the long time period required to demonstrate AGE related injury, and thus to test compounds for AGE inhibition. For example, 16 weeks of treatment was required for the rat studies described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,334,617, and 12 weeks for the rabbit studies. Thus it would be highly desirable and useful to have a model system for AGE related diabetic pathology that will manifest in a shorter time period, allowing for more efficient and expeditious determination of AGE related injury and the effectiveness of inhibitors of post-Amadori AGE formation.

Antibodies to AGEs

An important tool for studying AGE formation is the use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies that are specific for AGEs elicited by the reaction of several sugars with a variety of target proteins. The antibodies are screened for resultant specificity for AGEs that is independent of the nature of the protein component of the AGE (Nakayama et al., 1989, Biochem. Biophys. Res. Comm. 162: 740-745; Nakayama et al., 1991, J. Immunol. Methods 140: 119-125; Horiuchi et al., 1991, J. Biol. Chem. 266: 7329-7332; Araki et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267: 10211-10214; Makita et al., 1992, J. Biol. Chem. 267: 5133-5138). Such antibodies have been used to monitor AGE formation in vivo and in vitro.

Thiamine--Vitamin B1

The first member of the Vitamin B complex to be identified, thiamine is practically devoid of pharmacodynamic actions when given in usual therapeutic doses; and even large doses were not known to have any effects. Thiamine pyrophosphate is the physiologically active form of thiamine, and it functions mainly in carbohydrate metabolism as a coenzyme in the decarboxylation of .alpha.-keto acids. Tablets of thiamine hydrochloride are available in amounts ranging from 5 to 500 mg each. Thiamine hydrochloride injection solutions are available which contain 100 to 200 mg/ml.

For treating thiamine deficiency, intravenous doses of as high as 100 mg/L of parenteral fluid are commonly used, with the typical dose of 50 to 100 mg being administered. GI absorption of thiamine is believed to be limited to 8 to 15 mg per day, but may be exceed by oral administration in divided doses with food.

Repeated administration of glucose may precipitate thiamine deficiency in under nourished patients, and this has been noted during the correction of hyperglycemia.

Surprisingly, the instant invention has found, as shown by in vitro testing, that administration of thiamine pyrophosphate at levels above what is normally found in the human body or administered for dietary therapy, is an effective inhibitor of post-Amadori antigenic AGE formation, and that this inhibition is more complete than that possible by the administration of aminoguanidine.

Pyridoxine--Vitamin B6

Vitamin B6 is typically available in the form of pyridoxine hydrochloride in over-the-counter preparations available from many sources. For example Beach pharmaceuticals Beelith Tablets contain 25 mg of pyridoxine hydrochloride that is equivalent to 20 mg of B6, other preparations include Marlyn Heath Care Marlyn Formula 50 which contain 1 mg of pyridoxine HCl and Marlyn Formula 50 Mega Forte which contains 6 mg of pyridoxine HCl, Wyeth-Ayerst Stuart Prenatal.RTM. tablets which contain 2.6 mg pyridoxine HCl, J&J-Merck Corp. Stuart Formula.RTM. tablets contain 2 mg of pyridoxine HCl, and the CIBA Consumer Sunkist Children's chewable multivitamins which contain 1.05 mg of pyridoxine HCl, 150% of the U.S. RDA for children 2 to 4 years of age, and 53% of the U.S. RDA for children over 4 years of age and adults. (Physician's Desk Reference for nonprescription drugs, 14th edition (Medical Economics Data Production Co., Montvale, N.J., 1993).

There are three related forms of pyridoxine, which differ in the nature of the substitution on the carbon atom in position 4 of the pyridine nucleus: pyridoxine is a primary alcohol, pyridoxal is the corresponding aldehyde, and pyridoxamine contains an aminomethyl group at this position. Each of these three forms can be utilized by mammals after conversion by the liver into pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, the active form of the vitamin. It has long been believed that these three forms are equivalent in biological properties, and have been treated as equivalent forms of vitamin B6 by the art. The Council on Pharmacy and Chemistry has assigned the name pyridoxine to the vitamin.

The most active antimetabolite to pyridoxine is 4-deoxypyridoxine, for which the antimetabolite activity has been attributed to the formation in vivo of 4-deoxypyridoxine-5phosphate, a competitive inhibitor of several pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzymes. The pharmacological actions of pyridoxine are limited, as it elicits no outstanding pharmacodynamic actions after either oral or intravenous administration, and it has low acute toxicity, being water soluble. It has been suggested that neurotoxicity may develop after prolonged ingestion of as little as 200 mg of pyridoxine per day. Physiologically, as a coenzyme, pyridoxine phosphate is involved in several metabolic transformations of amino acids including decarboxylation, transamination, and racemization, as well as in enzymatic steps in the metabolism of sulfur-containing and hydroxy-amino acids. In the case of transamination, pyridoxal phosphate is aminated to pyridoxamine phosphate by the donor amino acid, and the bound pyridoxamine phosphate is then deaminated to pyridoxal phosphate by the acceptor .alpha.-keto acid. Thus vitamin B complex is known to be a necessary dietary supplement involved in specific breakdown of amino acids. For a general review of the vitamin B complex see The Pharmacological Basis of Therapeutics, 8th edition, ed. Gilman, Rall, Nies, and Taylor (Pergamon Press, New York, 1990, pp. 1293-4; pp. 1523-1540).

Surprisingly, the instant invention has discovered that effective dosages of the metabolically transitory pyridoxal amine form of vitamin B6 (pyridoxamine), at levels above what is normally found in the human body, is an effective inhibitor of post-Amadori antigenic AGE formation, and that this inhibition may be more complete than that possible by the administration of aminoguanidine.

Formation of Stable Amadori/Schiff Base Intermediary

The typical study of the reaction of a protein with glucose to form AGEs has been by ELISA using antibodies directed towards antigenic AGEs, and the detection of the production of an acid-stable fluorescent AGE, pentosidine, by HPLC following acid hydrolysis. Glycation of target proteins (i.e. BSA or RNase A) with glucose and ribose were compared by monitoring ELISA reactivity of polyclonal rabbit anti-Glucose-AGE-RNase and anti-Glucose-AGE-BSA antibodies. The antigen was generated by reacting 1 M glucose with RNase for 60 days and BSA for 90 days. The antibodies (R618 and R479) were screened and showed reactivity with only AGEs and not the protein, except for the carrier immunogen BSA.

Claim 1 of 3 Claims

What is claimed is:

1. A method for treating a disorder selected from the group consisting of retinopathy and neurodegenerative disease, comprising administering to a hyperglycemic patient with one or more of retinopathy and neurodegenerative disease an amount effective of pyridoxamine to inhibit the conversion of Amadori compounds to post Amadori advanced glycation endproducts.




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