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Title:  Warming and nonirritating lubricant compositions and method of comparing irritation
United States Patent: 
7,005,408
Issued: 
February 28, 2006
Inventors: 
Ahmad; Nawaz (Monmouth Junction, NJ); Sun; Ying (Belle Mead, NJ); Lin; Shun Y. (Plainsboro, NJ)
Assignee: 
McNeil-PPC, Inc. (Skillman, NJ)
Appl. No.: 
137509
Filed: 
May 1, 2002


 

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Abstract

This invention relates to substantially anhydrous warming, non-toxic and nonirritating lubricating compositions containing polyhydric alcohols and an insulating agent. The invention also relates to methods of using such compositions for lubrication, administration of active ingredients and for preventing or treating dysmenorrhea.

Description of the Invention

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to personal lubricant compositions that are warming and nonirritating when applied to the skin or mucous membranes, especially the vaginal or oral mucosa. The compositions of this invention are substantially anhydrous and contain one or more polyhydric alcohol. This invention also relates to the method that can be used to test and compare the irritation of the compositions of this invention and other personal lubricants known to the art.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

In the field of personal lubricants and medicaments applied to mucosal membranes, from time to time attempts have been made to overcome the problem of the perception of cold. When an individual applies personal lubricant or medicament such compositions to internal mucosal membranes, often an individual experiences an uncomfortable, cold feeling due to the difference in temperature between the body and the ambient temperature.

An appreciable number of personal lubricant compositions are known to the art. These compositions range from jellies to liquids to vaginal suppositories and vary from being aqueous to oils to silicone based. The majority of the compositions actually used today are aqueous jellies or aqueous liquids. Almost all personal lubricants known and available for use today are cold to touch, a feeling that can be uncomfortable.

A number of compositions are known to the trade or described in the literature that claim to impart a warming sensation upon application to the skin or mucosa. Some of these compositions use plant extracts which are irritating to the skin and mucous membranes and give a feeling or perception of warmth by virtue of their irritant action. Others claim to enhance blood flow in order to cause tissue warming. Still others are alleged to work on the principle of freezing point depression and are well suited for heating in a microwave or cooling in a refrigerator. There is one cosmetic composition rendered self-heating by inclusion of compound containing a boron-to-boron linkage, which reacts exothermally with water.

One example of a composition known to the trade, Prosensual™, distributed by Lexie Trading, Inc., Fairlaw, N.J., contains plant extracts such as Cinnamon cassia (Cinnamon), Zingiber officinalis (Ginger), Mint, Sandalwood, Orange and Clove, which are all known to be skin irritants. Such a composition has the disadvantage of causing irritation to the mucosa, which can be problematic in relation to the vaginal or oral mucosa as irritation may promote the growth of unwanted bacteria and cause infection.

Another current composition, WET™ Heating Massage Oil, distributed by International, Valencia, Calif., uses Retinyl Palmitate (Vitamin A Palmitate), Prunus amygdalis (Prunes), Amara (Almond), Persica gratissima (Avacado Oil), Macdamia ternifulia Seed Oil, Kakeri Nut Oil, Helianthus annus (hybrid Sunflower), Cannabis sativa (Hemp) Seed Oil and Aloe vera. Most of these ingredients are known irritants that are not suitable for use on mucous membranes.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,895,658, entitled "Delivery of L-Arginine to Cause Tissue Warming, Sustained Release of Nitric Oxide to treat effects of Diabetes, Stimulate Hair Growth and Heal Wounds," describes a preparation for producing enhanced blood flow in tissues thus causing beneficial effects, such as warming cold tissues of hands and feet.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,513,629 entitled "Microwavable Heat Releasing and Absorbing Compositions and Container, Pliable Gel Comprising Humectant, Freezing Point Depressant, Gel Sealer, Polyacrylamide Absorbent, Corn Starch Binder, Mineral Oil and Plasticizers, Durability, Efficacy" describes compositions that have a high vapor points and are, therefore, suited for heating in a microwave oven or cooling in a freezer and placement in a suitable container or vinyl package, such as a hot-and-cold pack, but not for human consumption or use.

However, none of the foregoing compositions are actually "warm", or at a relatively higher temperature than the ambient temperature of the product or the surrounding environment.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,110,426, entitled "Method of Treating Skin and Hair with a Self Heated Cosmetic, Organic Boron-Oxygen-Boron Compounds" describes non-aqueous compositions such as shaving creams, that are rendered self-heating by including therein a compound containing at least one boron-oxygen-boron linkage, such as triethoxyboroxine. The boron-containing compound reacts exothermally with water or other protic material to increase temperature. Such compositions are not suitable for vaginal or oral use due to the potential toxicity of boron-containing compounds to the human reproductive system (Fail P A, et al., general, reproductive, developmental, and endocrine toxicity of boronated compounds., Reprod toxicol 12: 1, 1-18, January-February, 1998).

Physical energy forms have been utilized to enhance material transport across a membrane for therapeutic purposes. Such energy forms include electricity, ultrasound and thermal energy (e.g., heat-assisted drug delivery), (reviewed by Sun, in "Skin Absorption Enhancement by Physical Means: Heat, Ultrasound, and Electricity", Transdermal and Topical Drug Delivery Systems, Interpharm Press, Inc., 1997, pages 327-355). Local heating of a drug delivery system or formulation, as well as the skin or mucosal tissues, not only increases thermodynamic energy of drug molecules and membrane permeability to facilitate drug movement across a barrier membrane, it improves blood circulation in the tissue to expedite drug removal from the local tissue into the systemic circulation. Both processes leads to an enhanced absorption of the drug. Experimental evidence demonstrates that low-level heating (i.e., a tissue temperature of less than about 42° C.) significantly enhances percutaneous drug absorption.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,658,583 describes a heat-generating apparatus for improved dermal permeation of pharmaceuticals. The apparatus includes a thin drug formulation reservoir and a heat-generating chamber of oxidation reaction separated by a non-permeable wall. The drug formulation reservoir houses a predetermined amount of a formulation containing pharmaceutical agents. The heat-generating/temperature-regulating chamber includes a heat-generating medium consisting of carbon, iron, water and/or salt which is activated upon contact with oxygen in the air. However, a complicated heating device such as this is not suitable for use in the vaginal or oral cavity for obvious safety concerns.

Locally applied heat (such as an abdominal heating patch) has also been used to treat dysmenorrhea, or menstrual cramps, with demonstrated efficacy (Akin M D et al., Continuous low-level topical heat in the treatment of dysmenorrhea., Obstet Gynecol 97: 3, 343-9, March, 2001).

U.S. Pat. No. 6,019,782 describes disposable thermal body pads with heat generation via an oxidation reaction intended for relieving menstrual pain when applied onto the abdominal skin. There is currently a commercial product in the U.S. market for dysmenorrhea treatment based on abdominal heating, ThermaCare® Air-Activated Heatwraps, Menstrual Cramp Relief patches manufactured by Procter & Gamble (Cincinnati, Ohio). However, there are no products or description of internal localized heating to treat dysmenorrhea.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The compositions and methods of this invention relate to warming lubricant compositions that are non-toxic and non-irritating and that can be used as personal lubricants designed to come into contact with the skin or mucosa. When mixed with water, the compositions of this invention increase in temperature or generate warmth. This has a soothing effect on the tissues to which these compositions are applied.

The compositions of this invention may be applied to the skin or mucous membranes, preferably the vaginal or oral mucosa. The compositions of this invention are preferably substantially anhydrous and preferably contain at least one polyhydric alcohol.

We theorize that, when the polyhydric alcohols contained in the compositions of this invention come into contact with water or body moisture in humans, they react with the ambient water molecules to cause an increase in temperature or generate warmth, thus having a soothing effect on the tissues to which these compositions are applied.

Surprisingly, and contrary to the general belief that polyhydric alcohols in compositions are irritating to the mucosa, compositions of this invention containing such polyhydric alcohols have been found to be non-irritating. In fact, these compositions are very mild to the skin and mucous membranes. The compositions of this invention are soothing when applied to oral mucous membranes and may function to relieve minor irritation of the mouth and throat.

The combination of polyhydric alcohols in the compositions of this invention may also be used as a vehicle to solubilize otherwise insoluble drugs, including, but not limited to, antifungals, antibacterials, antivirals, analgesics, anti-inflammatory steroids, contraceptives, local anaesthetics, hormones and the like.

The compositions of this invention also preferably contain an insulating agent which functions to preserve the temperature increase by maintaining the heat within the composition after it has been applied to the skin or mucosa. More preferably, honey may be utilized as an insulating agent.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The compositions of this invention are substantially anhydrous, preferably containing less than about 20% water, more preferably containing less than about 5% water and, most preferably, containing less than about 3% water. Preferably, the compositions of this invention contain at least one polyhydric alochol, and more preferably, two polyhydric alcohols. Preferably the polyhydric alcohol portion of the compositions of this invention one or more polyhydric alcohols such as alkylene glycols and others selected from the following group: glycerin, propylene glycol, butylene glycol, hexalene glycol or polyethylene glycol of various molecular weight and the like and/or combination thereof. More preferably, the compositions of this invention contain a polyethylene glycol; most preferably, the polyethylene glycol may be selected from the following group: polyethylene glycol 400 or polyethylene glycol 300. The compositions of this invention should contain polyhydric alcohols in an amount from about 80% to about 98% by weight of the composition.

The compositions of this invention preferably also contain an insulating agent. More preferably, the insulating agent should be honey or esters of isopropyl alcohol and saturated high molecular weight fatty acids such as myristic or palmitic acid, e.g., isopropyl myristate and isopropyl palmitate. The insulating agent should be present in the compositions of this invention in an amount of from about 1% to about 5% by weight of the composition.

The compositions of this invention are unexpectedly self-preserving and may not require a preservative. However, a preservative may be added to impart an additional guarantee against microbial growth. A preservative may be selected from preservatives known to those of skill in the art, including, but not limited to, one or more of the following: methylparaben, benzoic acid, sorbic acid, gallic acid, propylparaben or the like. The preservative may be present in the compositions of this invention in an amount from about 0.01% to about 0.75% by weight of the composition.

The compositions of this invention may also preferably contain an ester. More preferably, the ester is a fatty acid ester. Most preferably, the ester may include, but is not limited to: isopropyl stearate, isopropyl myristate, isopropyl palmitate, isopropyl laurate and the like. Most preferably, the ester is isopropyl myristate.

The compositions of this invention may contain one or more water-soluble cellulose-derived polymers, gums, chitosans or the like. Such polymers contribute to the viscosity and bioadhesiveness of the compositions of this invention. Preferably, such cellulose-derived polymers are hydroxyalkylcellulose polymers. More preferably, the hydroxyalkylcellulose polymer is hydroxypropylcellulose or Klucel®, available commercially from Hercules Incorporated, Wilmington, Del.

The polyhydric alcohols used in the compositions of this invention are theorized to be useful as warming and heat-generating agents. Honey functions as an insulating agent, protecting the compositions from becoming too cold. The ester, preferably a fatty acid ester, functions as an emollient and lubricant. The cellulose polymer is useful as a viscosity building agent. The compositions of this invention are unique in that they lubricate, warm and soothe the tissues of the user, especially the oral and vaginal mucous membranes, without conveying a feeling of cold. Moreover, they are smooth and lubricating.

The compositions of this invention may be a liquid, a semi-solid, or a solid depending upon the particular intended use thereof. The compositions of this invention may also be formulated into soft or hard gelatin capsules, suppositories and impregnated into fabrics or polymers.

The compositions of this invention may be used as personal lubricants which convey a feeling of warmth. The feeling of warmth generated by the compositions of this invention is soothing to the skin or mucous membranes where they are applied. The compositions of the invention also possess a sweet and pleasant taste, which is of particular benefit when these compositions are used orally.

The compositions of this invention may also be used as personal moisturizers, which convey a feeling of warmth when applied to vaginal or oral mucosa.

The compositions of this invention may also be used as a vehicle to deliver medication or other treatment agents to the biomembranes including, but not limited to, hormones, antimicrobial or antifungal agents and the like. The antifungal agents is preferably an azole or imidazole, including but not limited to, miconazole, econazole, terconazole, saperconazole, itraconazole, butaconazole, clotrimazole, tioconazole, fluconazole and ketoconazole, vericonazole, fenticonazole, sertaconazole, posaconazole, bifonazole, oxiconazole, sulconazole, elubiol, vorconazole, isoconazole, flutrimazole and their pharmaceutically acceptable salts and the like. Other antifungal agents may include an allylamine or one from other chemical families, including but not limited to, ternafine, naftifine, amorolfine, butenafine, ciclopirox, griseofulvin, undecyclenic acid, haloprogin, tolnaftate, nystatin, iodine, rilopirox, BAY 108888, purpuromycin and their pharmaceutically acceptable salts.

Another embodiment of the invention are compositions for vulvovaginal use containing one or more antibiotics. The antibiotic may be chosen from the group including, but not limited to, metronidazole, clindamycin, tinidazole, ornidazole, secnidazole, refaximin, trospectomycin, purpuromycin and their pharmaceutically acceptable salts and the like.

Another embodiment of the compositions of this invention include compositions for vulvovaginal use containing one or more antiviral agents. Antiviral agents may preferably include, but are not limited to, immunomodulators, more preferably imiquimod, its derivatives, podofilox, podophyllin, interferon alpha, reticolos, cidofovir, nonoxynol-9 and their pharmaceutically acceptable salts and the like.

Still other embodiments of the compositions of this invention are compositions that include one or more spermicides. The spermicides may preferably include, but are not limited to, nonoxynol-9, octoxynol-9, dodecaethyleneglycol monolaurate, Laureth 10S, and Methoxypolyoxyethyleneglycol 550 Laurate and the like.

Still other embodiments of the compositions of this invention are compositions containing antimicrobial agents. The antimicrobial agents may preferably include, but are not limited to, chlorohexidine gluconate, sodium polystyrene sulfonate, sodium cellulose sulfate, silver particles of micro- and sub-micrometer sizes, silver salts and other antibacterial agents known to the art.

Yet other embodiments of the compositions of this invention are compositions that may include local anesthetics. The local anesthetics may preferably include, but are not limited to, benzocaine, lidocaine, dibucaine, benzyl alcohol, camphor, resorcinol, menthol and diphenylhydramine hydrochloride and the like.

Compositions of the invention may also include plant extracts such as aloe, witch hazel, chamomile, hydrogenated soy oil and colloidal oatmeal, vitamins such as vitamin A, D or E and corticosteroids such as hydrocortisone acetate.

Another embodiment of the compositions and methods of this invention include compositions for vulvovaginal use containing one or more hormones for treating a decrease in estrogen secretion in the woman in need of estrogen replacement such as women with vaginal atrophy. The hormones may preferably include, but are not limited to, estrogen selected from the group consisting of estradiol, estradiol benzoate, estradiol cypionate, estradiol dipropionate, estradiol enanthate, conjugated estrogen, estriol, estrone, estrone sulfate, ethinyl estradiol, estrofurate, quinestrol and mestranol.

Another embodiment of the compositions and methods of this invention include compositions for vulvovaginal use containing one or more analgesics and/or nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents for treating dysmenorrhea or mentrual cramping. The analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents may preferably include, but are not limited to, aspirin, ibuprofen, indomethacin, phenylbutazone, bromfenac, fenamate, sulindac, nabumetone, ketorolac, and naproxen and the like.

Yet another embodiment of the compositions and methods of this invention include compositions for oral and vulvovaginal use relates to a method of enhancing the absorption of active agents from the applied compositions into the mucosal membrane by increasing the composition and mucosal tissue temperature via interaction of the polyhydric alcohols in the compositions and moisture on the mucosa and subsequently released heat.

Yet another embodiment of the compositions of this invention include compositions for vulvovaginal use relates to compositions and methods for preventing and/or treating dysmenorrhea by intravaginal warming or heating. Preferably, the composition heats the intravaginal area to a temperature preferably between about 37° C. and about 42° C., more preferably between about 38° C. and about 41° C. The compositions of invention for use in such a method may optionally contain active agents such as analgesics and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents for dysmenorrhea treatment. The composition of the invention may be administered directly into the vagina by an applicator, or be impregnated into vaginal devices such as tampon for intravaginal applications.

The compositions of this invention may be manufactured as a coating of a tampon, or dispersing throughout the absorbent tampon material, or enclosed inside as a core of a tampon. The compositions of this invention for the warming tampon for preventing and/or treating dysmenorrhea preferably include a mixture of polyethylene glycols of various molecular weights produced by The Dow Chemical Company (Midland, Mich.) under the trade names of CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 300 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 400 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 600 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 900 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 1000 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 1450 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 3500 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 4000 NF, CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 4600 NF, and CARBOWAX SENTRY PEG 8000 NF. The compositions of this invention for dysmenorrhea prophylaxis and treatment may contain one or more water-soluble cellulose-derived polymers and gums that form gels around the polyhydric alcohols such as glycerin, propylene glycol and polyethylene glycols thus reducing the dissolution of the polyhydric alcohols, prolonging the salvation heat release, and regulating the elevated temperature in the preferred temperature range.
 

Claim 1 of 31 Claims

1. A substantially anhydrous lubricant composition comprising at least one polyhydric alcohol and an insulating agent wherein said insulating agent is honey.

____________________________________________
If you want to learn more about this patent, please go directly to the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office Web site to access the full patent.

 

 

     
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